How To Make DIY Beeswax Wraps Without Resin (Fast & Easy).

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Why would you want to make a DIY beeswax wraps?  Well if you care about the environment and want a replacement for your plastic wrap, these might do the trick.

It’s a very simple DIY.   You do not need to use a bunch of hard to find ingredients, and you can make 12 of them for under $20.00 CDN.    That’s a steal.

They are also SUPER cute.  Perfect for hostess gifts or handmade presents!

If you like the label wraps in the photo, I included them down below as a printable.

DIY beeswax wrap packages lined up on a wooden board.

A Step by Step Process to Make Your Own Bees Wax Wraps

Abeego Beeswax wraps on white bowls on a wooden board.

I purchased a set of Abeego, Beeswax Food Storage Wraps from Amazon for $20.00 CDN.   It wouldn’t be very fair for me to say that the DIY version was just as good if I didn’t have anything for comparison.

The ingredients listed for the Abeego beeswax wraps are beeswax, hemp cotton, pine resin, and jojoba oil. I imagine that the pine resin is added to make them sticky.

I tried the Abeego wraps on several different bowls, and the product did not stick.  So even though they have that bit of tackiness, they don’t attach to the sides of bowls as the same way plastic wrap does.

The Abeego beeswax wraps do bend very well and hold the shape you put them in, so if you add them to the top of a bowl and pinch them down, they turn into custom covers.  I liked this feature a lot; it’s like always having the perfect sized cover.

They also work very well to wrap sandwiches, cheese, sausage, etc., think dry and firm when you’re covering something that is not in a container or bowl.

I liked these beeswax wraps a lot!    They have been in heavy rotation in my kitchen these past few weeks.

I did think they would stick a bit better, but it wasn’t a deal-breaker for me at all that they didn’t.

For anyone who can’t be bothered to DIY their own, you could try these Abeego wraps instead.

What type of wax for your DIY Beeswax Wraps?

Yellow bricks of beeswax on a dark wooden board.

Beeswax.  I used organic, and I had purchased both the small 30 gram bricks and a package of purified beeswax pellets to see what would work best.

The pellets were the way to go.   If you go with solid beeswax, you will need to shred it.  Grating the beeswax is not an easy task as the wax is hard.

The pellets, on the other hand, were very easy to use, just a sprinkle over your fabric and you are good to go.

What kind of fabric do you use?

Fat quarter fabric swatches.

Cotton.   100% cotton, tightly woven fabric is perfect.  You want something with a tight weave, nothing loose.

Also, from my experience, the wax does yellow.  Even if you use the white wax, the heat from the iron will turn it slightly yellow.  You don’t notice it on darker fabric, but you do see the yellowing on lighter materials.

Also, make sure your fabric is colorfast.  I washed and dried my fabric before using it, but my white fabric with colored flowers still bled.  When the wax heated, it pulled the dye and moved it around.

Closeup of beeswax wraps.

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What tools do I need to make my own DIY Beeswax Wrap?

  • Organic Cotton Fabric (or use any tightly woven 100% cotton fabric)
  • Organic White Beeswax Pellets
  • Iron
  • An old towel or drop cloth
  • Scissors
  • Parchment paper (NOT wax paper)

I bought four very inexpensive fat quarters (18×22 inch precut fabric), and one pound of beeswax pellets and the total cost was $30.00 CDN.

I only used half the wax bringing the full total to all 12 wraps to $20.00 CDN, the same price I paid for my Abeego beeswax wraps.

No jojoba oil or pine resin was used to make my beeswax wraps.  I wanted to test if the wax fabric would work using just beeswax.

So what’s the difference between the DIY wraps and the Abeego?

The only difference between the Abeego Beeswax wraps and the DIY version was stickiness.  The Abeego beeswax wraps were tacky to the touch.   Although they were sticky(ish) they did not stick to anything.  They did, however, stick to each other quite well.

I had to rough up my DIY Beeswax wraps to give them a bit more cling.  I found the more I used them, the better they worked, but they never felt tacky to the touch and don’t quite stick to each other the same way the Abeego wraps do.

DIY Beeswax wrap on bowls and laid out on a wooden board.

Cutting fabric and preparing it for waxing

Wash and dry your fabric before cutting.

You can cut your DIY beeswax wrap to any size.  I used the Abeego beeswax wraps that I had as a template for sizing.  One fat quarter will give you random sizes, depending on big or small you want to make them.

The three sizes that I made were 7 inches, 10 inches, and 13 inches.  From a fat quarter, you cannot get all three, so some of my sets have one large and two small, or two medium and one small.

Well let me clarify, I couldn’t get it to work, but I was also never very good at Tetris, so you’re mileage may vary here.

Step 2 – set up your parchment paper & Iron

Fabric being waxed between two sheets of parchment paper.

I did not use my ironing board because I was afraid I would get wax on it, so I set up an old towel on my dining room table.

I bought the widest roll of parchment I could find.

If you make your DIY beeswax wrap large, you will want to overlap parchment sheets on top and the bottom.  Give yourself a border of at least 3 inches all around of parchment, or you will seep wax out onto your iron.

Step 3 – adding the wax and ironing

Fabric swatch laid out on a piece of parchment sprinkled with tiny pellets of organic white beeswax.

Set up your fabric between your two sheets of parchment and sprinkle on your Organic White Beeswax Pellets.

I used two tablespoons of pellets on a 13-inch square piece of fabric, and it was enough.

Set your iron for linen, and when it is hot pass it over the parchment paper.  The wax below will start to melt.  Keep moving the iron and do not let it stay in the same place for too long.

Ironing a DIY beeswax wrap between two pieces of parchment.

As the wax melts, you can push it around with the pressure from the iron.  I started in the center and pushed outward to make sure that the corners and the edges had enough wax.

If you pull back your parchment and see fabric that was missed add a few more pellets and run the iron over it again.  Easy peasy.

Don’t pull your DIY beeswax wrap off the parchment until it has had at least a minute to cool.  If you pull it right away, you will burn your fingertips off. Don’t ask me how I know.

Safety Tips & Things worth mentioning

Beeswax blocks next to several bowls covered by beeswax wraps.

I need to add, that is very important that you do not get wax on your iron.  Make sure your parchment covers your fabric very well.

If you do get wax on your iron, wipe it on the towel a few times.

If you do not remove the wax from your iron it will start to smoke, your fire alarm will go off, and your dogs will go mental.  Ask me how I know.

Fabric sandwiched between two pieces of parchment paper. Liquid wax is leaking out at the edges.

Also, important to note that beeswax is combustible.  If you leave your iron too long, or if you get wax on the iron it could ignite.  Just be careful.

It’s a good idea to wear heatproof gloves to be on the safe side.  The wax does get hot enough to stick to your skin and burn!  Be mindful of where that melted wax is and keep it away from your iron and your fingers.

Step 4 – Cleaning up your DIY Beeswax wraps

A DIY beeswax wrap trimmed after waxing with a small pair of scissors.

Once your DIY beeswax wraps cool, you can trim them up.   I used a sharp pair of embroidery scissors to get a clean, crisp edge.  Since the wax sheets are stiff, it makes it very easy to trim up.

The wraps fold easily too, but when you fold them that fold is there forever or unless you run it back under the iron (between two parchment sheets!).

To clean them you rinse under cold water and wipe or hang dry.

So how do you use them?

These beeswax wraps work great to make covers for anything, or as a wrap for dry foods like cheese, or sandwiches.  I tested a block of cheese in an Abeego wrap and a DIY beeswax wrap and had no issues with either one. The cheese was perfect at the end of the week.

The best things to use them with are dry or hard foods with little moisture.

They do not work well with anything wet.  You can’t cover a halved avocado or lemon.  These beeswax wraps don’t work that way, unfortunately.

Give them as gifts!

These beeswax wraps make great gifts for anyone who is eco-conscious and someone who loves to cook.  They also make a lovely hostess gift, or you can give them away as handmade holiday gifts.

DIY beeswax wraps packaged neatly and lined up on a table.

If you want to download the packing label you can that here:

beeswax-wrap-packaging-label

Printable label.

Looking For More DIY Gift Ideas?

How To Make DIY Beeswax Wraps Without Resin.

How To Make DIY Beeswax Wraps Without Resin.

Yield: 20-24
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Active Time: 30 minutes
Additional Time: 30 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour 10 minutes
Difficulty: Easy
Estimated Cost: $20

Easy to make, eco-friendly DIY beeswax wraps made without resin.

Materials

  • Organic Cotton Fabric (or use any tightly woven 100% cotton fabric)
  • Organic White Beeswax Pellets
  • An old towel or drop cloth
  • Parchment paper (NOT wax paper)

Tools

  • Scissors
  • Iron

Instructions

  1. Wash and dry your fabric before cutting.
  2. You can cut your DIY beeswax wrap to any size.  I used the Abeego beeswax wraps that I had as a template for sizing.  One fat quarter will give you random sizes, depending on big or small you want to make them. The three sizes that I made were 7 inches, 10 inches, and 13 inches.  From a fat quarter, you cannot get all three, so some of my sets have one large and two small, or two medium and one small.
  3. Add an old towel to the table you are working on and cover it with a wide piece of parchment paper.
  4. If you make your DIY beeswax wrap large, you will want to overlap parchment sheets on top and the bottom.  Give yourself a border of at least 3 inches all around of parchment, or you will seep wax out onto your iron.
  5. Set up your fabric between your two sheets of parchment and sprinkle on your organic white beeswax pellets.
  6. Use approx two tablespoons of pellets on a 13-inch square piece of fabric.
  7. Set your iron for linen, and when it is hot pass it over the parchment paper.  The wax below will start to melt.  Keep moving the iron and do not let it stay in the same place for too long.
  8. As the wax melts, you can push it around with the pressure from the iron.  I started in the center and pushed outward to make sure that the corners and the edges had enough wax.
  9. If you pull back your parchment and see any fabric that was missed add a few more pellets and run the iron over it again.  Easy peasy.
  10. Don't pull your DIY beeswax wrap off the parchment until it has had at least a minute to cool.  If you pull it right away, you will burn your fingertips.

Notes

Beeswax is combustible. Do not leave the iron rest in the same place for too long.

Make sure your parchment paper has at least a 3-inch overlap of your fabric to avoid hot wax getting on your iron. If you do get wax on your iron, wipe it off immediately on the towel. Beeswax on your iron will smoke enough to set off your fire alarms.

Wear gloves. The wax is hot, the iron is hot, and it makes sense to protect your fingers and hands from burns.

Lighter fabrics will turn yellow, and fabric that is not colorfast made bleed.

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27 Comments

  1. Hi, thank you for your very informed and amusing tutorial. I was given a heap of beeswax sheets. I guess they are what one uses to make the rolled Beeswax candles. I have no idea if they are organic. Do you think I could use the sheets to make the beeswax wraps?

    1. hey Deb, glad you enjoyed the tutorial. You can absolutely use the beeswax sheets, no problem. I’d roll them and shave them into flakes to make it easier and have less wax pooling. But it should work just the same. Cheers!

    1. You are so welcome Rebecca, I hope they work out for you! I showed my husband your note and said: ” see someone thinks I’m funny” … lol, cheers!

  2. I’m thinking of making these but would prefer the dipping process rather than the iron. What are your thoughts on adding a few drops of jojoba oil to the melted beeswax (omitting the resin)? I thought that since jojoba oil is in fact a wax, it would help with the stickiness.

    1. Hi Paula, adding a few drops of jojoba oil is fine, I didn’t do it because I wanted to see if they would work without it and without resin. Cheers!

  3. How do you get the wax off of the brush? In between sheets my brush would harden. I would rest it in the melting pot to try and soften it but I am not sure how to clean/revive it. Thanks.

    1. Hi Deb, I actually kept my brush as a wax brush since I make these often for friends and family. To revive it, I would get it soft in the melted wax, use gloves and squeeze out as much wax as you can. Soak it hot sudsy water with something like Dawn. You may have to wash the brush multiple times, but you will get the wax out. Cheers!

  4. I just purchased some of these at the Famer’s Wife Vintage Event in Yuba City. Glad to know the details on what it will and will not work on!

    1. I’ve seen my husband try to wrap slices of tomato with them – I just watched in awe. ( it didn’t work out so great) – but they are handy to have, and they last for such a long time.

        1. You can wash them in luke warm water with a bit of washing liquid. If you’re worried about bacteria and want to give them a really good clean you can spray them down with hydrogen peroxide, let it sit for a minute, and then rinse them off and dry them with a clean dishtowel. Cheers!

  5. Very cool! I have been given some a while ago and they’ve lost all their wax, I was wondering if it was possible to rewax them and I’ve now found that I can!! I’m excited to try it out! Thanks for your adventurous spirit!!!

    1. Oh, that’s awesome Louise. I rewaxed mine in the summer for the same reason. Thanks for leaving such a wonderful comment too, so appreciated!

    1. Hi Melissa, Cold water with a tiny bit of soap will do the trick. If you find they get a bit bent out of shape and hard you can always press them between two sheets of parchment with a hot iron to reset them. Don’t wash them in hot water, or allow them to sit in water and be sure to dry wipe them.

  6. Hello, first and foremost, thank you for your great instructions. I want to pass this on to my friend who as her own honey bees and just wanted to make sure that she could use the wax that is collected from harvesting?

    1. Hi Jenny, If the wax is processed ( ie all sugars are removed) it should work just fine. I would be worried about residual honey in the wax while I was pressing, but it would burn, and create a very stiff beeswax wrap. But if the wax is clean, there is no reason why it couldn’t be used in this project. Cheers!

  7. I’ve re-read everything, I think. Please tell me, did you do Both sides of the cotton, or just one?
    We have a purchased set that is wax on both sides.

    1. Hi Kim, you only need to add the wax shaving or pellets to one side. The wax seeps through to the other side making both sides waxed. If you have any questions as you start to make yours drop me a line. Cheers!

    1. Any fabric shop should have a section of organic cotton. You can make your beeswax wraps from any 100% cotton. Cheers

  8. These look amazing!! I have been thinking about using the beeswax wraps in my kitchen, making my own would be even better.
    Your tutorial is perfect (and I’m sorry about the burned fingers…I’m sure I would do the same). I have a ton of cotton fat quarters. Just need more beeswax!

    1. They are fun a project. I found they took a bit to work in and after they were used a few times and scrunched up a bunch they worked even better. Thanks for the comment Rhoda, and good luck with your beeswax wraps!

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